Facets Of Fiction

Color Words

I’m not claiming to be an expert on color words, or that this is a complete list of color words, at the time I was researching a Victorian painter and needed a semi-clue what words would have been appropriate for colors in her time. Most of this info was taken from www.dictionary.com, before they got taken over by Ask.com which ruined the site. And thanks to WordMenu and Wikipedia for the lists of colors.


White
Gray
Black
Brown
– Reddish Brown
Red
Pink
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Purple

Key:

color name: color description (meaning of word), date first used [bf = before], local mainly used [Amer = Americanism], possibly another color description taken from a dictionary referenced by www.dictionary.com


White:

  • alabaster: white and translucent (a finely granular variety of gypsum), 1400; pale yellowish pink to yellowish gray
  • argent: like silver; silvery white (Heraldry. the tincture or metal silver), 1450
  • blond: light-colored, 1475; light yellowish brown to dark grayish yellow (blonde: femenine)
  • bone: ivory or off-white (one of the structures composing the skeleton of a vertebrate), bf 900
  • chalk:  pure flat white with little reflectance (a soft, white, powdery limestone consisting chiefly of fossil shells of foraminifers), bf 900
  • Chinese white: white pigment made from zinc oxide, largely used in watercolors and for giving opacity to other colors, 1850 (zinc white)
  • columbine: dove-colored (of a dove or a plant, Aquilegia caerula, of the buttercup family, having showy flowers with white petals and white to blue sepals that form long, backward spurs), 1400
  • dove: warm gray with a slight purplish or pinkish tint (any bird of the family Columbidae, esp. the smaller species with pointed tails), 1600
  • eggshell: pale yellowish-white color (the shell of a bird’s egg, consisting of keratin fibers and calcite crystals), 1300 flake white: a pigment made of flakes of white lead: 1660 (lead white)
  • gauze: a thin haze (any thin and often transparent fabric made from any fiber in a plain or leno weave), 1555
  • ivory: creamy or yellowish white (the hard white substance, a variety of dentin, composing the main part of the tusks of the elephant, walrus, etc.), 1300
  • lead white: a pigment made of flakes of white lead: 1660 (flake white)
  • milk-white: white or slightly blue-white color, 1000
  • nacre: mother-of-pearl, iridescent layer, 1718
  • off-white: white mixed with a small amount of gray, yellow, or other light color, 1930
  • oyster: a slightly grayish white (any of several edible, marine, bivalve mollusks of the family Ostreidae), 1900; pale yellowish green to light gray
  • pearl: very pale gray approaching white but commonly with a bluish tinge (a smooth, rounded bead formed within the shells of certain mollusks), 1350
  • platinum: light, metallic gray with very slight bluish tinge when compared with silver, 1815; medium to light gray
  • pure white: the color of pure snow, of the margins of this page, etc.; reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light, bf 900 (white)
  • putty: light brownish- or yellowish-gray (a compound of whiting and linseed oil, of a doughlike consistency when fresh), 1635
  • silver: lustrous grayish white or whitish gray (a white, ductile metallic element), bf 900
  • snow: white color of snow (a precipitation in the form of ice crystals), bf 900
  • white:  the color of pure snow, of the margins of this page, etc.; reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light, bf 900 (pure white)
  • zinc white: white pigment made from zinc oxide, largely used in watercolors and for giving opacity to other colors, 1850 (Chinese white)

Gray:

  • ash: light, silvery-gray color (the powdery residue of matter that remains after burning), bf 950
  • battleship gray: subdued bluish gray, American 1835
  • brindled: gray or tawny with darker streaks or spots, 1680
  • charcoal: dark grayish brown to black or dark purplish gray (the carbonaceous material obtained by heating wood or other organic substances in the absence of air), 1350; very dark grey
  • cinereous: ashen; ash-colored; grayish (in the state of or reduced to ashes), 1655; gray color tinged with black
    clouded: covered with or as if with clouds, dark region or blemish, 1600
  • dark gray
  • dove: warm gray with a slight purplish or pinkish tint (any bird of the family Columbidae, esp. the smaller species with pointed tails): 1600
  • flint: dark gray (a hard stone, a form of silica resembling chalcedony but more opaque, less pure, and less lustrous), bf 900
  • granite: (a coarse-grained igneous rock composed chiefly of orthoclase and albite feldspars and of quartz, usually with lesser amounts of one or more other minerals, as mica, hornblende, or augite), 1650
  • gray: color between white and black; having a neutral hue, bf 900
  • greige: unbleached and undyed, 1925
  • iron: silver-white metallic, bf 900
  • lead: bluish-gray metal, bf 900
  • light gray
  • merle: a bluish gray color mottled with black (the blackbird), 1905
  • moleskin: soft, deep-gray, fragile fur of the mole, 1670
  • mouse: Meaning “black eye” (or other discolored lump) is from 1842
  • mushroom : (any of various fleshy fungi including the toadstools, puffballs, coral fungi, morels, etc.) 1400
  • neutral: gray; without hue, 1450; indicating a color, such as gray, black, or white, that lacks hue; achromatic
  • pale gray
  • pelican: (any of several large, totipalmate, fish-eating birds of the family Pelecanidae, having a large bill with a distensible pouch) bf 1000
  • plumbago: soft, steel-gray to black (graphite), 1605
  • salt-and-pepper: fine mixture of black with white , 1775
  • silver gray: light brownish-gray, 1600; light shade of grey
  • slate: dull, dark bluish gray (a fine-grained rock formed by the metamorphosis of clay, shale, etc., that tends to split along parallel cleavage planes, usually at an angle to the planes of stratification), 1350; dark or bluish gray to dark bluish or dark purplish gray
  • smoke: bluish or brownish gray color (the visible vapor and gases given off by a burning or smoldering substance), bf 1000; pale to grayish blue to bluish or dark gray
  • steel gray: dark metallic gray with a bluish tinge, 1845
  • taupe: moderate to dark brownish gray, sometimes slightly tinged with purple, yellow, or green, 1915

Black:

  • atramentous: black, like ink (pertaining to ink)
  • black: lacking hue and brightness; absorbing light without reflecting any of the rays composing it’ color at one extreme end of the scale of grays, opposite to white, absorbing all light incident upon it, bf 900
  • blue-black: black with bluish highlights, 1825
  • Brunswick black: Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware (japan black), 1920
  • carbon:  (a widely distributed element that forms organic compounds in combination with hydrogen, oxygen, etc., and that occurs in a pure state as diamond and graphite, and in an impure state as charcoal) 1790
  • ebony: deep, lustrous black (a hard, heavy, durable wood, most highly prized when black), 1600
  • ink: Inky “as black as ink” is attested from 1593
  • Japan black: Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware (brunswick black), 1920
  • jet: deep black (a compact black coal, susceptible of a high polish, used for making beads, jewelry, buttons, etc.), 1400
  • lampblack: fine black pigment (a fine black pigment consisting of almost pure carbon collected as soot from the smoke of burning oil, gas, etc.), 1600
  • nigrescent: tending toward black; blackish, 1755
  • obsidian: shiny black (a volcanic glass), 1400
  • onyx: black, esp. jet black (A chalcedony [microcrystalline, translucent variety of quartz] that occurs in bands of different colors and is used as a gemstone, especially in cameos and intaglios), 1300
  • piceous: glossy black (pertaining to, or resembling pitch), 1650
  • pitch black: extremely black or dark as pitch (any of various dark, tenacious, and viscous substances for caulking and paving, consisting of the residue of the distillation of coal tar or wood tar), 1600
  • pure black
  • raven: lustrous black (any of several large, corvine birds having lustrous, black plumage and a loud, harsh call, esp. Corvus corax, of the New and Old Worlds), bf 900
  • sable: very dark; black (an Old World weasellike mammal, Mustela zibellina, of cold regions in Eurasia and the North Pacific islands, valued for its dark brown fur), 1325
  • soot: fine black (a black, carbonaceous substance produced during incomplete combustion of coal, wood, oil), bf  900
  • swarthy: a dark complexion or color, 1580

Brown:

  • acorn: nut of an oak tree, bf 1000
  • amber: yellowish-brown (a pale yellow, sometimes reddish or brownish, fossil resin of vegetable origin, translucent, brittle), 1400
  • anthracene: heavy green oil (crystalline hydrocarbon, C14H10, extracted from coal tar and used in the manufacture of dyes and organic chemicals, a heavy green oil (partially solidifying on cooling), which distills over from coal tar at a temperature above 270[deg]. It is the principal source of anthracene), 1865
  • autumn leaf
  • beige: light grayish brown or yellowish brown to grayish yellow, 1860
  • biscuit: pale-brown color (a kind of bread in small, soft cakes, raised with baking powder or soda, or sometimes with yeast. [Chiefly British, a cookie]), 1350
  • bistre: yellowish to dark-brown color, a brown pigment extracted from the soot of wood, often used in pen and wash drawings, 1730
  • brindle/brindled: gray or tawny with darker streaks or spots, 1680
  • bronze: metallic brownish color, moderate yellowish to olive brown (any of various alloys consisting essentially of copper and tin, the tin content not exceeding 11 percent), 1740
  • brown: dark tertiary color with a yellowish or reddish hue, bf 1000; group of colors between red and yellow in hue that are medium to low in lightness and low to moderate in saturation
  • brunet (male of brunette): dark brown, 1890
  • brunette (feminine of brunet): dark color or tone, dark brown or black 1715
  • buff: brownish-yellow color; tan (soft, thick, light-yellow leather with a napped surface, originally made from buffalo skin but later also from other skins), 1555
  • burnt almond: 1850
  • burnt umber: dark dusky brown or dark reddish brown (earth consisting chiefly of a hydrated oxide of iron and some oxide of manganese, used in its natural state as a brown pigment), 1300
  • butternut: light-brown color (edible oily nut of an American tree, Juglans cinerea, of the walnut family), 1745
  • café au lait: light brown color (french: coffee with milk), 1765
  • camel: color ranging from yellowish tan to yellowish brown (either of two large, humped, ruminant quadrupeds of the genus Camelus), bf 950
  • Cologne brown: a medium brown color, 1850 (vandyke brown)
  • dark brown
  • doeskin: (the skin of a doe), 1475
  • Dresden: (the capital of Saxony in E Germany, on the Elbe River)
  • dun: dull, grayish brown, bf 1000
  • earth: any of various pigments consisting chiefly of iron oxides and tending toward brown in hue (the planet third in order from the sun), bf 950
  • ecru: very light brown in color (french: raw, unbleached), 1870; grayish to pale yellow or light grayish-yellowish brown
  • fallow: pale-yellow; light-brown; dun, bf 1000
  • fawn: light yellowish-brown  (a young deer, esp. an unweaned one), 1275
  • fox: (any of several carnivores of the dog family, esp. those of the genus Vulpes, smaller than wolves, having a pointed, slightly upturned muzzle, erect ears, and a long, bushy tail), bf 900; grey or reddish-brown fur of a fox
  • hazel: light golden brown  (any shrub or small tree belonging to the genus Corylus, of the birch family), bf 900; shade of brown that is yellowish or reddish; it is a greenish shade of brown when used to describe the color of someone’s eyes
  • khaki: dull yellowish brown (a stout, twilled cotton cloth of this color), 1860
  • leather: (skin of an animal, with the hair removed), bf 1000
  • light brown
  • manila: light yellow brown (1697, capital of the Philippines, gave its name to manilla hemp (1814), original source of manilla paper (1873))
  • maple sugar: yellowish-brown (sugar made by boiling down maple syrup), 1720
  • Mars brown: medium brown (a brown pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron oxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties and permanence); bright, somewhat yellowish, brown
  • mink: (a semiaquatic weasellike animal of the genus Mustela, esp. the North American M. vison.), 1475
  • mocha: brownish chocolate color, 1895 (mixture of coffee and chocolate, 1849)
  • negro: (“member of a black-skinned race of Africa,” 1555, from Sp. or Port.)
  • nougat: (a chewy or brittle candy containing almonds or other nuts and sometimes fruit) 1830
  • nutria: light brown fur (coypu, aquatic South American rodent resembling a small beaver) 1820, Amer
  • otter: dark brown fur (any of several aquatic, furbearing, weasellike mammals of the genus Lutra and related genera), bf 900
  • peppercorn: (dried berry of the pepper vine), bf 1000
  • pongee: (silk of a slightly uneven weave made from filaments of wild silk woven in natural tan color), 1715
  • putty: light brownish- or yellowish-gray (a compound of whiting and linseed oil, of a doughlike consistency when fresh), 1635
  • raffia: (leaf fibers of the African palm tree), 1885
  • raw sienna: yellowish-brown pigment (a ferruginous earth used as a yellowish-brown pigment), 1760
  • raw umber: brown pigment (earth consisting chiefly of a hydrated oxide of iron and some oxide of manganese, used in its natural state as a brown pigment), 1300
  • sandalwood: light to moderate or grayish brown (fragrant heartwood of any of certain Asian trees of the genus Santalum), 1515
  • seal: dark, gray brown (any of numerous marine carnivores of the suborder Pinnipedia, including the eared or fur seals, as the sea lion, and the earless or hair seals, as the harbor seal), bf 900
  • tan: yellowish brown; light brown (to convert a hide into leather), bf 1000
  • tawny: dark yellowish or dull yellowish-brown color, 1400; light brown to brownish orange
  • toast: (to brown, as bread or cheese, by exposure to heat), 1400
  • topaz:  light brown the color of topaz (yellow quartz), 1275
  • umber: brown pigment (earth consisting chiefly of a hydrated oxide of iron and some oxide of manganese, used in its natural state as a brown pigment), 1300
  • Vandyke brown: a medium brown color (any of several dark-brown pigments consisting of iron oxide mixed with lampblack or similar materials), 1850; moderate to grayish brown (Cologne brown)
  • walnut: dark-brown wood (the edible nut of trees of the genus Juglans), 1050

Reddish Brown:

  • auburn: reddish-brown or golden-brown color, 1600; moderate reddish brown to brown
  • baize: (a soft, usually green, woolen or cotton fabric resembling felt, used chiefly for the tops of billiard tables), 1580
  • bay: reddish brown, 1350
  • brick red: yellowish or brownish red, 1810; moderate to strong reddish brown
  • burgundy: a grayish red-brown to dark blackish-purple color (wine, of many varieties, red and white, mostly still, full, and dry, produced in the Burgundy region),  1672
  • burnt ocher
  • burnt sienna: reddish-brown pigment (a ferruginous earth used as a yellowish-brown pigment (raw sienna) or, after roasting in a furnace, as a reddish-brown pigment (burnt sienna)), 1760
  • caramel: yellowish brown or tan color (a liquid made by cooking sugar until it changes color), 1725
  • Castilian brown
  • chestnut: reddish brown (any of the several deciduous trees constituting the genus Castanea), 1400
  • chocolate: dark brown color (a preparation of the seeds of cacao, roasted, husked, and ground, often sweetened and flavored, as with vanilla), 1605
  • cinnamon: yellowish or reddish brown (the aromatic inner bark of any of several East Indian trees belonging to the genus Cinnamonum), 1450
  • cocoa: brown; yellowish brown; reddish brown (a powder made from roasted, husked, and ground seeds of the cacao), 1710
  • cordovan: (a soft, smooth leather originally made at Córdoba of goatskin but later made also of split horsehide, pigskin, etc.), 1595
  • fulvous: tawny; dull yellowish-gray or yellowish-brown, 1665
  • ginger: yellowish or reddish brown (a reedlike plant, Zingiber officinale, native to the East Indies but now cultivated in most tropical countries), bf 1000, (used especially of hair or fur) having a bright orange-brown color
  • henna: midway between red-brown and orange-brown (an Asian shrub or small tree, Lawsonia inermis, a reddish-orange dye or cosmetic made from the leaves of this plant), 1600
  • light red-brown
  • liver: reddish-brown color (a large, reddish-brown, glandular organ located in the upper right side of the abdominal cavity), bf 900
  • mahogany: reddish-brown color (any of several tropical American trees of the genus Swietenia), 1675
  • nutmeg: grayish to moderate brown (the hard, aromatic seed of the fruit of an East Indian tree, Myristica fragrans, used in grated form as a spice), 1350
  • ocher: ranging from pale yellow to an orangish or reddish yellow (any of a class of natural earths, mixtures of hydrated oxide of iron with various earthy materials, ranging in color from pale yellow to orange and red, and used as pigments), 1400
  • oxblood: deep dull-red color, 1705, dark or deep red to medium reddish brown
  • piccolopasso
  • reddish brown
  • roan: ((chiefly of horses) of the color sorrel, chestnut, or bay, sprinkled with gray or white), 1530
  • russet; yellowish brown, light brown, or reddish brown, 1275; moderate to strong brown
  • sand: light reddish- or brownish-yellow color (the more or less fine debris of rocks, consisting of small, loose grains, often of quartz), bf 900
  • sedge: (any rushlike or grasslike plant of the genus Carex, growing in wet places), bf 900
  • sepia: dark brown, a brown, grayish brown, or olive brown similar to that of sepia ink (a brown pigment obtained from the inklike secretion of various cuttlefish and used with brush or pen in drawing), 1570
  • sienna: reddish-brown pigment (a ferruginous earth used as a yellowish-brown pigment (raw sienna) or, after roasting in a furnace, as a reddish-brown pigment (burnt sienna)), 1760
  • sorrel: light reddish-brown (a horse of this color, often with a light-colored mane and tail), 1450
  • terra cotta: brownish-orange color (a hard, fired clay, brownish-red in color when unglazed), 1725
  • titian: a reddish-brown or golden-brown color (Italian painter who introduced vigorous colors and the compositional use of backgrounds to the Venetian school), 1580; brownish orange
  • Venetian red: dark shade of orangish red (a red pigment, originally prepared from a natural oxide of iron, now usually made by calcining a mixture of lime and ferrous sulfate), 1755; deep to strong reddish brown

Red:

  • alizarin crimson: scarlet red (a pigment used in painting, derived from anthraquinone and characterized by its red color and transparency), ?
  • alpenglow: (a reddish glow often seen on the summits of mountains just before sunrise or just after sunset), 1875
  • annatto: (lipstick tree. a small tree, Bixa orellana, of tropical America, a yellowish-red dye obtained from the pulp enclosing the seeds of this tree, used for coloring fabrics, butter, varnish, etc.), 1685 caribbean
  • blood-red: deep-red color of blood, 1300; moderate to vivid red
  • bois de rose: grayish red or dark purplish red color (french rosewood),
  • bougainvillea: (any of several South American ornamental woody vines of the genus Bougainvillea having brilliant red or purple flower bracts; widely grown in warm regions), 1789
  • Bordeaux: (red or white wine produced in the region around Bordeaux, France), bf 1150
  • brick red: yellowish or brownish red, 1810; moderate to strong reddish brown
  • brownish red
  • cadmium red: strong red (a pigment used in painting, consisting of the sulfide and the selinide of cadmium, characterized by its strong red or reddish color, excellent film-forming properties, and slow drying rate), 1890
  • cardinal: deep, rich red color (of prime importance; chief; principal: a woman’s short cloak with a hood, originally made of scarlet cloth and popularly worn in the 18th century: N.Amer. songbird (Cardinalis virginianus) is attested from 1678, so named for its resemblance to the red robes of the cardinals), bf 1150
  • carioca: (a modification of the samba), 1935; (a native of Rio de Janeiro), 1830
  • carmine: crimson or purplish-red color (a crimson pigment obtained from cochineal insects), 1705
  • carnelian: pale to deep red or reddish-brown (red or reddish variety of chalcedony, used in jewelry), 1695
  • Castilian red
  • cerise: moderate to deep red (french for cherry), 1860; deep to vivid purplish red
  • cherry: bright red (the fruit of any of various trees belonging to the genus Prunus), 1350; moderate or strong red to purplish red
  • Chinese red: vivid red to reddish orange (bright red mercuric sulfide used as a pigment), 1895 (vermilion, cinnabar)
  • cinnabar: vivid red to reddish orange (bright red mercuric sulfide used as a pigment), 1400 (vermilion, chinese red)
  • claret: deep purplish red (the red table wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France: originally it was light red or yellowish), 1400
  • cochineal: vivid red (a red dye prepared from the dried bodies of the females of the cochineal insect), 1585
  • cranberry: (the red, acid fruit or berry of certain plants of the genus Vaccinium), 1640, Americanism
  • crimson: deep purplish-red, 1425
  • crimson lake
  • damask: pink color of the damask rose (a reversible fabric of linen, silk, cotton, or wool, woven with patterns), 1250
  • dark red
  • faded rose
  • fire-engine red: very bright red color, ?
  • garnet: deep-red color (any of a group of hard, vitreous minerals, silicates of calcium, magnesium, iron, or manganese with aluminum or iron, varying in color), 1325; dark to very dark red
  • geranium: vivid red color (any of numerous plants of the genus Geranium), 1550
  • grenadine: (a syrup made from pomegranate juice), 1710
  • gules: red (the tincture red), 1350
  • indian red: reddish-brown color (iron oxide used as a paint and cosmetic pigment), 1755
  • iron red: (Iron Red is a saturated iron red glaze with a crystalline semi gloss surface. The glaze surface has flecks of crystalline iron, which give it a metallic look. The overall color is burgundy)
  • jockey: (a person who rides horses professionally in races) 1530
  • light red
  • lobster: (any of various large, edible, marine, usually dull-green, stalk-eyed decapod crustaceans of the family Homaridae, esp. of the genus Homarus, having large, asymmetrical pincers on the first pair of legs, one used for crushing and the other for cutting and tearing: the shell turns bright red when cooked; Slang for “a British soldier” since 1643, originally in reference to the jointed armor of the Roundhead cuirassiers, later (1660) to the red coat.), bf 1000
  • madder lake: strong purple-red color (a pigment of this color formerly obtained from the madder root, characterized chiefly by lack of permanence). 1825 (rose madder)
  • maroon: dark brownish-red, 1595
  • Mars red: deep red-orange color (red pigment used in painting, artificially made from an iron oxide base and characterized by strong film-forming properties and permanence), 1895
  • murrey: dark purplish-red color, 1425 (mulberry)
  • orange-red
  • oxblood: deep dull-red color, 1705, dark or deep red to medium reddish brown
  • paprika: dark to deep or vivid reddish orange (a red, powdery condiment derived from dried, ripe sweet peppers), 1900
  • peach: light pinkish yellow (the subacid, juicy, drupaceous fruit of a tree, Prunus persica), 1375
  • Persian red
  • pinkish red
  • ponceau: vivid red to reddish-orange color (any of several azo dyes (as Biebrich scarlet) giving red colors and used as biological stains), 1835
  • poppy: vivid red to reddish orange (any plant of the genus Papaver, having showy, usually red flowers), bf 900
  • Prussian red
  • puce: dark or brownish purple: 1780; deep red to dark grayish purple
  • red: any of various colors resembling the color of blood; the primary color at one extreme end of the visible spectrum, an effect of light with a wavelength between 610 and 780 nm, bf 900
  • rhodamine: synthetic red to pink dyes having brilliant fluorescent qualities  (a red dye obtained by heating an alkyl aminophenol with phthalic anhydride), 1890; yellowish red to blue fluorescent dyes
  • rose madder: strong purple-red color (a pigment of this color formerly obtained from the madder root, characterized chiefly by lack of permanence). 1890 (madder lake)
  • ruby: deep red; carmine (a red variety of corundum, used as a gem), 1325; dark or deep red to deep purplish red
  • rust: reddish yellow, reddish brown, or yellowish red  (the red or orange coating that forms on the surface of iron when exposed to air and moisture), bf 900
  • scarlet: bright-red color inclining toward orange, 1250
  • stammel: bright red (The red color of a coarse woolen cloth sometimes used for undergarments), middle english
  • strawberry: red (the fruit of any stemless plant belonging to the genus Fragaria), bf 1000
  • tile red: light red like the color of tiles or bricks, ?
  • Tyrian purple: a vivid, purplish red, 1585
  • Venetian red: dark shade of orangish red (a red pigment, originally prepared from a natural oxide of iron, now usually made by calcining a mixture of lime and ferrous sulfate), 1755; deep to strong reddish brown
  • vermilion: vivid red to reddish orange (bright red mercuric sulfide used as a pigment), 1300 (Chinese red, cinnabar)
  • wild cherry: (the fruit of the wild cherry tree), ?
  • wine: dark reddish color (the fermented juice of grapes), bf 900

Pink:

  • begonia: (any tropical plant belonging to the genus Begonia), 1710
  • blush: rosy or pinkish (to redden, as from embarrassment or shame), 1325
  • cameo: (a technique of engraving upon a gem or other stone, as onyx, in such a way that an underlying stone of one color is exposed as a background for a low-relief design of another color), 1425
  • carnation: pink; light red (any of numerous cultivated varieties of the clove pink, Dianthus caryophyllus), 1535
  • casino pink
  • coral: reddish yellow; light yellowish red; pinkish yellow (the hard, variously colored, calcareous skeleton secreted by certain marine polyps), 1325; deep or strong pink to moderate red or reddish orange
  • damask: pink color of the damask rose (a reversible fabric of linen, silk, cotton, or wool, woven with patterns), 1250
  • deep pink
  • fiesta: (any festival or festive celebration), 1845
  • flamingo: moderate reddish orange  (any of several aquatic birds of the family Phoenicopteridae), 1565
  • hot pink: wikipedia: This intense magenta was called shocking pink in the 1930s, hot pink in the 1950s, and kinky pink in the 1960s
  • incarnadine: blood-red; crimson, flesh-colored; pale pink, 1595
  • livid pink: (livid:  1. Discolored, as from a bruise; black-and-blue. 1622, 2. Ashen or pallid: a face livid with shock.3. Extremely angry; furious. 1912)
  • mallow pink: (mallow: Any of various plants of the genus Malva, having pink or white axillary flowers, palmate leaves, and disklike schizocarpic fruits., bf 1000)
  • melon: medium crimson or deep pink (the fruit of any of various plants of the gourd family, as the muskmelon or watermelon), 1400
  • moonlight: (the light of the moon), 1375
  • nymph: (one of a numerous class of lesser deities of mythology, conceived of as beautiful maidens inhabiting the sea, rivers, woods, trees, mountains, meadows, etc., and frequently mentioned as attending a superior deity), 1400
  • ombre: (A card game, played by three players with 40 cards, that was popular in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries), 1650
  • orchid rose
  • pale pink: a light, desaturated shade of pink
  • peach: light pinkish yellow (the subacid, juicy, drupaceous fruit of a tree, Prunus persica), 1375
  • petal pink
  • pink: a color varying from light crimson to pale reddish purple, 1575; Any of a group of colors reddish in hue, of medium to high lightness, and of low to moderate saturation
  • reddish pink
  • rose: dark pink to moderate red (any of the wild or cultivated, usually prickly-stemmed, pinnate-leaved, showy-flowered shrubs of the genus Rosa), bf 900
  • royal pink
  • salmon: light yellowish-pink (a marine and freshwater food fish), 1250; moderate, light, or strong yellowish pink to a moderate reddish orange or light orange
  • shell pink: delicate whitish to yellow pink, 1890
  • shocking pink: vivid or intensely bright pink, 1940
  • solferino: vivid purplish pink, 1859
  • tea rose: pale to strong yellowish pink  (any of several cultivated varieties of roses having a scent resembling that of tea), 1850

Orange:

  • apricot: pinkish yellow or yellowish pink (the downy, yellow, sometimes rosy fruit, somewhat resembling a small peach, of the tree Prunus armeniaca), 1555; a moderate, light, or strong orange to strong orange yellow
  • aurora: (a brilliant display of bands or folds of variously colored light in the sky at night, especially in polar regions), 1400
  • burnt Roman ocher: a deep, rich orange color, transparent and durable, used by artists
  • cadmium orange: a yellow color approaching orange (orange-hued cadmium yellow pigment), 1895
  • carotene: yellow or orange-red (an orange isomer of an unsaturated hydrocarbon found in many plants), 1865
  • carrot: deep orange (a plant, Daucus carota), 1535
  • chrome orange: The color of the pigment can range from light to deep orange, the hiding power is excellent, Alternative names: Derby red, Persian red, Victoria red (1809-1900)
  • copper: metallic reddish brown (a malleable, ductile, metallic element having a characteristic reddish-brown color), bf 1000
    dark orange
  • helianthin: (an artificial, orange dyestuff), 1885; (an orange-yellow, slightly water-soluble powder)
  • mandarin: The type of small, deep-colored orange so called from 1771, from resemblance of its color to that of robes worn by mandarins (“Chinese official,”).
  • marigold: 1373, marygolde, from Mary (probably a reference to the Virgin) + gold, for color. The O.E. name for the flower was simply golde.
  • mikado
  • ocher: ranging from pale yellow to an orangish or reddish yellow, 1400
  • orange:a color between yellow and red in the spectrum, an effect of light with a wavelength between 590 and 610 nm; reddish yellow, 1542
  • pale orange
  • pumpkin: moderate to strong orange, 1654
  • realgar: arsenic disulfide, As2S2, found in nature as an orange-red mineral and also produced artificially: used in pyrotechnics, 1400
  • red-orange
  • Rubens’ madder: The russet known as Rubens’ madder has a tendency to orange.
  • Spanish ocher: very bright yellow
  • tangerine: deep orange; reddish orange, 1899
  • terra cotta: brownish-orange color (a hard, fired clay, brownish-red in color when unglazed), 1725
  • yellow-orange

Yellow:

  • amber: the color of amber; yellowish-brown, 1400
  • auramine: a yellow, crystalline solid, C17H22ClN3, soluble in water, alcohol, and ether, used chiefly as a dye for paper and leather, 1885
  • aureolin: a pigment used in painting, consisting of potassium cobaltinitrite and characterized by its brilliant yellow hue, transparency, and permanence (cobalt yellow), 1880
  • azo yellow: medium shade yellow pigment
  • barium yellow: a yellow, crystalline compound, BaCrO4, used as a pigment (barium chromate)
  • blond (blonde: feminine): Of a flaxen or golden color or of any light shade of auburn or pale yellowish brown, 1485
  • brass: metallic yellow; lemon, amber, or reddish yellow, bf 1000
  • brazen: Resembling brass, as in color or strength, bf 1000
  • brazilin: a yellow, water-soluble, needlelike, crystalline solid, obtained from brazil and sappanwood: used as a dye and an indicator, 1865
  • buff: brownish-yellow color; tan, 1580: the yellowish-beige color of buff leather
  • butter: soft yellowish of butter, bf 1000
  • cadmium yellow: a pigment used in painting, consisting of cadmium sulfide and characterized by its strong yellow color and permanence, 1875
  • calendula: Also called pot marigold. a composite plant, Calendula officinalis, widely cultivated for its showy, many-rayed orange or yellow flower heads, 1875
  • canary: a light, clear yellow color, 1595
  • Cassel yellow: a lemon-yellow color, 1885
  • chalcedony: a microcrystalline, translucent variety of quartz, often milky or grayish, 1325
  • chamois: a medium to grayish yellow color, 1535
  • champagne: a very pale yellow or greenish-yellow color, 1665
  • chrome yellow: any of several yellow pigments in shades from lemon to deep orange, composed chiefly of chromates of lead, barium, or zinc, 1820
  • citron: a grayish-green yellow color (a pale-yellow fruit resembling the lemon but larger and with thicker rind), 1425
    corn: the color of corn, 1620
  • cream: a yellowish white; light tint of yellow or buff
  • crocus: a deep yellow; orangish yellow; saffron, 1400
  • dandelion: golden-yellow, 1515: brilliant to vivid yellow
  • flax: pale grayish yellow, 1523
  • gamboges: yellow or yellow-orange, 1635
  • gold: bright, metallic yellow color, sometimes tending toward brown, bf 900
  • goldenrod: strong to vivid yellow, 1570
  • green-yellow
  • honey: having the color of honey, yellowish or brownish, bf 900
  • Indian yellow: orange-yellow, Also called purree. A yellow pigment formerly derived from the urine of cows fed on mango leaves. A pigment derived from coal tar, characterized chiefly by its yellow color and permanence, 1870
  • jonquil: a narcissus, Narcissus jonquilla, having long, narrow, rushlike leaves and fragrant, yellow or white flowers, 1630
  • lemon: a clear, yellowish-green color, 1810, a moderate to brilliant vivid yellow
  • linen: , bf 900
  • maize: a pale yellow resembling the color of corn, 1555
  • mustard: dark yellow to light olive brown, 1848
  • Naples yellow: a poisonous pigment used in painting and enameling, consisting chiefly of lead antimoniate and characterized by its fugitive yellow color, rapid drying rate, and strong film-forming properties, also called antimony yellow, 1740
  • orange-yellow
  • orpiment: a mineral, arsenic trisulfide, As2S3, found usually in soft, yellow, foliated masses, used as a pigment, 1400
  • pale yellow: a variable yellow tint; dull yellow, often diluted with white
    palomino: a horse with a golden coat, a white mane and tail, and often white markings on the face and legs, 1910, Amer
  • pear: , bf 1000
  • primrose: pale yellow, 1425
  • purree: having the color Indian yellow, orange-yellow, 1855
  • quince: yellowish, either of two small trees of the rose family, bearing hard, fragrant, yellowish fruit used chiefly for making jelly or preserves, 1325
  • reed
  • saffron: yellow-orange, 1200
  • safranine: any of a class of chiefly red organic dyes, 1870
  • sallow: of a sickly, yellowish color, bf 1000
  • sand: a light reddish- or brownish-yellow color, bf 900
  • snapdragon: (any plant belonging to the figwort family, cultivated for its spikes of showy flowers, each having a corolla supposed to resemble the mouth of a dragon, 1575)
  • straw: of the color of straw; pale yellow, bf 950
  • sulphur/sulfur: yellow with a greenish tinge; lemon color, 1350
  • sunflower: brilliant yellow to strong or vivid orange yellow, 1565
  • wheaten: of the color of wheat, esp. a pale yellow-brown color, bf 900
  • yellow: a color like that of egg yolk, ripe lemons, etc.; the primary color between green and orange in the visible spectrum, an effect of light with a wavelength between 570 and 590 nm., bf 900
  • yellow ocher: ranging from pale yellow to an orangish or reddish yellow (any of a class of natural earths, mixtures of hydrated oxide of iron with various earthy materials, ranging in color from pale yellow to orange and red, and used as pigments), 1400
  • yolk: the yellow and principal substance of an egg, bf 1000

Green:

  • absinthe: a green, aromatic liqueur, 1615
  • aqua: a light greenish-blue color, 1400
  • avocado: a dull green, 1947
  • beryl: A usually green or bluish-green hexagonal mineral occurring as transparent to translucent prisms in igneous and metamorphic rocks. Transparent varieties, such as emeralds and aquamarine, are valued as gems, 1305
  • bice: A pale blue pigment, Green bice is prepared from the blue, by adding yellow orpiment, or by grinding down the green carbonate of copper, ?
  • blue-green: a color about midway between blue and green in the spectrum, 1855
  • brewster
  • Brunswick green: an oxychloride of copper, used as a green pigment; also, a carbonate of copper similarly employed
    cadmium green: a pigment used in painting, consisting of a mixture of hydrated oxide of chromium with cadmium sulfide, and characterized by its strong green color and slow drying rate, 1935
  • celadon: a pale gray-green, 1770
  • chartreuse: a clear, light green with a yellowish tinge, 1870
  • chrome green: very dark yellowish green to moderate or strong green, 1880
  • clair de lune: a pale-green color, a very pale blue color, tinged with lavender, used as a glaze on Chinese porcelain, 1880
  • corbeau
  • cucumber: (a creeping plant, Cucumis sativus, of the gourd family, occurring in many cultivated forms, 1400)
  • cypress: (any of several evergreen coniferous trees constituting the genus Cupressus, having dark-green, scalelike, overlapping leaves, bf 1000)
  • dark green
  • drake
  • emerald: a clear, deep-green color, 1300
  • fir green
  • flagstone (rock, as sandstone or shale, suitable for splitting into flagstones, 1730)
  • forest green: an olive-green color, 1810  (also Lincoln green)
  • grass green: yellowish green, a moderate yellow-green to strong or dark yellowish-green
  • gray-green: of green tinged with grey
  • green: of the color of growing foliage, between yellow and blue in the spectrum, bf 900
  • green earth: a pigment used in painting consisting mainly of iron silicate, characterized chiefly by its variable grayish-green hue, lack of tinting strength, and permanence (also called terra verde), 1795
  • gunpowder: (Also called gunpowder tea. a fine variety of green China tea, each leaf of which is rolled into a little ball, 1800s)
  • holly: any of numerous trees or shrubs of the genus having glossy, spiny-toothed leaves, bf 1150
  • jade: green, varying from bluish green to yellowish green, 1595
  • kelly green: a strong yellow-green, 1940, Amer.
  • Kendal green: a shade of green produced by a dye extracted from the woadwaxen plant, 1505
  • leaf: as in the green of a leaf, bf 900
  • light green
  • lime: greenish yellow, 1625
  • Lincoln green:  an olive-green color (A color of cloth formerly made in Lincoln, England; the cloth itself), 1510
  • lizard
  • loden: deep olive-green (a thick, heavily fulled, waterproof fabric, used in coats and jackets for cold climates), 1915
  • lotus
  • malachite: A light to dark green carbonate mineral, 1350
  • marine
  • mint: (any member of the mint family of plants), bf 1000
  • moss green: a moderate to dark yellow-green color, 1885
  • myrtle green: dark green with bluish tinge, 1400
  • Niagara green: a light bluish green, 1935
  • Nile green: pale bluish green, 1890: a moderate yellow green to vivid light green
  • olive green: green with a yellowish or brownish tinge, 1760
  • pale green
  • parrot
  • patina: (a film or incrustation, usually green, produced by oxidation on the surface of old bronze and often esteemed as being of ornamental value, 1750)
  • pea green: a medium or yellowish green, 1745
  • pistachio green: a light or medium shade of yellow green, 1800
  • reseda: a light or medium shade of yellow green (like the flowers of the mignonette), 1755
  • sea green: a clear, light, bluish green, 1600
  • serpentine: (a common mineral, usually oily green and sometimes spotted, occurring in many varieties: used for architectural and decorative purposes, 1400)
  • shamrock: (any of several trifoliate plants, as the wood sorrel, 1575)
  • spruce: grayish green to dark greenish black, 1400
  • teal: a medium to dark greenish blue (small freshwater duck), 1923
  • terre verte: a grayish-green color (also called green earth), 1660
  • tourmaline: (any of a group of silicate minerals of complex composition, containing boron, aluminum, etc., usually black but having various colored, transparent varieties used as gems) 1760
  • turquoise: greenish blue or bluish green, 1400
  • verdigris: (a green or greenish blue poisonous pigment resulting from the action of acetic acid on copper, consisting of one or more basic copper acetates, and formerly used in medicine), 1300
  • viridian: a long-lasting, bluish-green pigment, consisting of a hydrated oxide of chromium (also called veridian), 1885
  • willow (green: any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix, bf  900)
  • yellow-green: a color containing both yellow and green, 1770
  • yew: (any of several evergreen, coniferous trees and shrubs of the genera Taxus and Torreya, bf 900)

Blue:

  • aqua: a light greenish-blue color, 1400, 1936
  • aquamarine: light blue-green or greenish blue, 1846
  • azure: a light, purplish blue, 1325
  • baby blue: a very light blue, 1890
  • bice: a pale blue pigment, ?
  • blue: the pure color of a clear sky; the primary color between green and violet in the visible spectrum, an effect of light with a wavelength between 450 and 500 nm, 1300
  • blueberry: (sweet edible dark-blue berries of blueberry plants, 1710)
  • bluebonnet: (a blue-flowered lupine, having spikes of light blue flowers with a white or yellow spot, 1685)
  • calamine blue
  • cerulean: deep blue; sky blue; azure, 1670
  • clair de lune: a pale-green color, a very pale blue color, tinged with lavender, used as a glaze on Chinese porcelain, 1880
  • cobalt blue: a deep blue to a strong greenish-blue color, 1835
  • Copenhagen blue: gray-blue
  • cornflower: a deep, vivid blue, 1580
  • cyan blue: a moderate greenish-blue to bluish-green color, 1880
  • Delft blue: (between 1600 and 1800 Delft was one of the most important ceramics producers in Europe, with distinctive blue and white patterns)
  • Dresden blue: (dusty country blue, ceramics with distinctive blue color)
  • flag blue
  • gentian: any of several plants of the genera Gentiana, Gentianella, and Gentianopsis, having usually blue flowers, 1400
  • greenish blue: a shade of blue tinged with green
  • Havana lake
  • Helvetia blue: (also known as Cotton blue, Methyl blue, Acid blue 93, or C.I. 42780 is a chemical compound used as a stain in histology)
  • huckleberry: (the dark-blue or black edible berry of any of various shrubs belonging to the genus Gaylussacia of the heath family, 1670, Amer)
  • hydrangea: (any shrub belonging to the genus Hydrangea, cultivated for their large, showy flower clusters of white, pink, or blue, 1753)
  • ice blue: a very pale blue color
  • Indanthrene: (a blue, crystalline, water-insoluble solid used as a dye for cotton and as a pigment in paints and enamels)
    indigo: a color ranging from a deep violet blue to a dark, grayish blue, 1555
  • jouvence
  • lapis lazuli: a sky-blue color; azure, 1400
  • light blue
  • Lucerne: (important European leguminous forage plant with trifoliate leaves and blue-violet flowers grown widely as a pasture and hay crop, alfalfa, 1630)
  • lupine: (any plant of the genus Lupinus; bearing erect spikes of usually purplish-blue flowers, 1398)
  • marine
  • Methyl blue: (also known as Cotton blue, Helvetia blue, Acid blue 93, or C.I. 42780) is a chemical compound used as a stain in histology.
  • midnight blue: a dark shade of blue, close to black, that was named for its darkness
  • milori
  • Napoleon blue
  • navy blue: a dark blue, 1840
  • pale blue
  • peacock blue: a lustrous greenish blue, as of certain peacock feathers, 1885
  • periwinkle: a pale purplish blue, 1500
  • powder blue: a pale blue diluted with gray, 1710
  • Prussian blue: a moderate to deep greenish blue, 1725
  • purple-blue: of blue tinged with purple
  • reddish blue: a variable color that lies beyond blue in the spectrum, violet
  • royal blue: a deep blue, often with a faint reddish tinge, 1820, a bright, darkish blue, a deep to strong blue
  • saxe blue
  • sea blue
  • sky blue: the color of the unclouded sky in daytime; azure, 1730
  • smalt: a deep blue paint and ceramic pigment produced by pulverizing a glass made of silica, potash, and cobalt oxide, 1560
  • steel blue: dark bluish gray, 1820
  • teal blue: a medium to dark greenish blue (small freshwater duck), 1923
  • turquoise: greenish blue or bluish green, 1400
  • ultramarine: a deep-blue color, 1600
  • Venetian blue: a strong blue similar to cobalt blue, 1840
  • water blue
  • Wedgwood blue
  • wisteria: (any climbing shrub belonging to the genus Wisteria, of the legume family, having showy, pendent clusters of blue-violet, white, purple, or rose flowers, 1818)
  • woad: (a European plant, Isatis tinctoria, of the mustard family, formerly cultivated for a blue dye extracted from its leaves, bf 1000)
  • zaffer: (an artificial mixture, resembling smalt, containing cobalt oxide and, usually, silica, used to produce a blue color in glass and in ceramic glazes, 1665)

Purple:

  • amaranth: A deep reddish purple to dark or grayish, purplish red, 1551: a red acid azo dye that is used chiefly in coloring foods, beverages, and pharmaceutical preparations and in dyeing wool and silk
  • amethyst: a purplish tint, 1300: a moderate purple to grayish reddish purple
  • Argyle
  • aubergine: a dark purplish color, 1795, British. (eggplant)
  • blue-violet: of violet tinted with blue
  • bluish purple
  • bokhara
  • campanula: (any of various plants of the genus Campanula, which includes the harebell, bellflower, and Canterbury bells, 1665)
  • clematis: (any of numerous plants or woody vines of the genus Clematis, including many species cultivated for their showy, variously colored flowers, 1555)
  • dahlia: a pale violet or amethyst color, 1791
  • damson: a medium to dark violet, 1400
  • deep purple
  • fuchsia: a bright, purplish-red color, 1755
  • gentian violet: a violet dye derived from rosaniline, used in chemistry as an indicator and in medicine as a fungicide, bactericide, anthelmintic, and in the treatment of burns, 1900
  • grape: a dull, dark, purplish-red color, 1250
  • gridelin: color mixed of white, and red, or a gray violet
  • heather: grayish purple to purplish red, 1350
  • heliotrope: a light tint of purple; reddish lavender, 1590
  • hyacinth: deep purplish blue to vivid violet (a bulbous Mediterranean plant (Hyacinthus orientalis) ), 1555
  • imperial purple
  • lavender: a pale bluish purple, 1275
  • light purple
  • lilac: pale reddish purple, 1791 (lilac as a scent, 1895)
  • magenta: a deep purplish red, 1860
  • mauve: a pale bluish purple, 1860: a moderate grayish violet to moderate reddish purple
  • monsignor
  • mulberry: a tree of this genus, as M. rubra (red mulberry or American mulberry) bearing dark-purple fruit, 1275
  • orchid: bluish to reddish purple (any terrestrial or epiphytic plant of the family Orchidaceae, of temperate and tropical regions, having usually showy flowers), 1845
  • pale purple
  • pansy: a deep to strong violet (a violet, Viola tricolor hortensis, cultivated in many varieties, having richly and variously colored flowers, 1500)
  • periwinkle: a pale purplish blue, 1500
  • phlox: (any plant of the genus Phlox, of North America, certain species of which are cultivated for their showy flowers of various colors, 1605)
  • plum: a deep purple varying from bluish to reddish, bf 900
  • prune: (dried plum, 1345)
  • purple: any color having components of both red and blue, such as lavender, esp. one deep in tone, bf 1000
  • raisin: dark purplish blue, 1400
  • raspberry: a dark reddish-purple color, 1625
  • reddish purple: a shade of purple tinged with red
  • royal purple: a deep bluish purple, 1665
  • rubine
  • solferino: vivid purplish pink, 1859
  • tulip: (any of various plants belonging to the genus Tulipa cultivated in many varieties, and having lance-shaped leaves and large, showy, usually erect, cup-shaped or bell-shaped flowers in a variety of colors, 1580)
  • Tyrian purple: a vivid, purplish red, 1585
  • violet: reddish-blue, a color at the opposite end of the visible spectrum from red, an effect of light with a wavelength between 400 and 450 nm., 1350
  • violetta

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